HOME / NEWS / A Viral Angry Mob Was Not the Kind of Viral You Were Hoping For

March 6th, 2014

A Viral Angry Mob Was Not the Kind of Viral You Were Hoping For

A Viral Angry Mob Was Not the Kind of Viral You Were Hoping For

by Scout

Last week the news around the social media water cooler was that Kelly Blazek had been nasty to someone via email, then the recipient of that email posted it to Reddit, and the rest is sad history involving an angry Internet mob with virtual pitchforks.

The lesson seems obvious, “don’t treat people badly, there’s an Internet out there”.  Of course, not being a jerk is a generally good rule of thumb for life, regardless.

Still, even if it seems a lack of common sense and common decency brought down Blazek, this kind of rabid, online take-down keeps some businesses up at night. “What if…what if there’s a misstep and we can’t control it?”

You’re right to be worried. We’re not going to lie.  You can be a darling one day, and the most hated personality/business/organization the next. With one misplaced word, one wrong joke, one rogue employee, one bad day, one loss of temper.

It doesn’t take much to whip up an angry Internet mob.

If that doesn’t make you tremble in your Facebook-inspired boots, we don’t know what will.

Ok, hold on. Lean in here so we can give you a few hints to ease your mind and help you avoid being on the receiving end of an Internet smack-down.

1.  Don’t be a hypocrite – the truth is, Blazek’s error was not that she was a jerk to someone; it was that she acted hypocritically. Online she presented herself as a humble, “just here to help” kind of person. In the offending email she acted arrogant, dismissive, rude, unkind, and certainly not helpful. No one likes hypocrisy. In fact, people really hate hypocrisy. It’s a form of lying, and it’s a trust-breaker. There are plenty of online personalities who get away with being a jerk because they don’t pretend to be anything else.

2. Never Step on the Underdog – Everyone loves the underdog, so take care not to step on one. If you do, expect the angry mob to rush in to defend and protect.  Underdogs are anyone who are earnest and have less power than you.

3. Be careful with the jokes – but not so careful that you have zero sense of humor. If you want to play it safe, stay away from politically incorrect jokes, or generally making a joke at someone else’s expense. Even Ellen Degeneres can’t always get away with her jokes. One safe avenue is to keep your jokes “in-house” – in other words, make fun of yourself.

4. Respond quickly to criticism – the longer someone waits for an apology, the angrier they get. If you get a phone call or email from an unhappy customer/client, respond in a timely manner. If you’re not able to respond within 12 hours, set up an auto-response letting people know how long the expected reply time is. Your first line of defense is to resolve complaints offline. If a customer takes to Social Media with their complaint, you have little time to respond before anger at being “ignored” sets in. Have a system for monitoring in place so you’re ready to respond.

5. Go beyond the apology – If you find yourself having to apologize to someone online, go beyond the apology and into the lesson.

This doesn’t cover every possible scenario, but implementing the above tips will help you avoid some major mishaps in Social Media. One other piece of advice…make sure someone with high emotional intelligence is at the helm of your Social Media.

Photo credit:  1931 Frankenstein movie still

Tags: , , , ,

December 17th, 2013

Don’t stress this holiday

Don’t stress this holiday

by Scout

With the hustle and bustle of the holiday season and the crunch of year-end deadlines looming, take comfort in the fact that while you’re preoccupied, we’re watching your shop.

This season is a particularly important time to make sure that the online arena for your business is free from cyber bullies or others whose ill-used words could negatively affect your operations. This time of year seems to bring out the trolls – and the grinches – who infiltrate sites with spam and wreak havoc on an otherwise enjoyable online experience.

(more…)

Tags: , ,

January 16th, 2013

Scout Moderation represents you!

Scout Moderation represents you!

by Scout

photo credit:  US Library of Congress

Abraham Lincoln has certainly been on our radar these days.  A small piece of his presidency is highlighted in the Golden Globe-nominated film Lincoln by director Steven Spielberg, featuring a tour-de-force performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as Honest Abe.

While the film covers the last four months of Lincoln’s presidency as he worked to abolish slavery in 1865, it also depicts Lincoln’s gift for making memorable speeches.  The 16th president of the United States was very quotable, to say the least.  Many sayings attributed to him still resonate today, including these words he once made famous: “He who represents himself has a fool for a client.”

(more…)

Tags: , , ,

May 18th, 2010

Part 2: A terrible example of why moderation is crucial

Part 2: A terrible example of why moderation is crucial

by Scout

Photo credit:  Michaela Karle Photography  All Rights Reserved

If you’ve been reading the news lately, you know that the cyber bullying controversy is huge – and recently tragic.  People from all over the world have heard about the Phoebe Prince case and are extremely concerned and interested in finding a solution.

(more…)

Tags: , , , , , ,

April 6th, 2010

Why did we name ourselves SCOUT Moderation?

Why did we name ourselves SCOUT Moderation?

by Scout

photo credit:  Frontier Scout Calamity Jane – Library of Congress

The internet is the new Frontier, but unlike the Wild West, it is limitless.  There are countless people, groups and websites – sure we could count them today, but the number will just be bigger tomorrow.  The boundaries don’t lie where we can see them, like where California became the Pacific Ocean.  And the boundaries, well, they aren’t really boundaries as technology continues to expand at an accelerated rate.

(more…)

Tags: , , ,

Archives: